LOSING IT

LOSING IT

    Price: $310.00

    Code: 1888
    Format: DVD

    Directed by Sharon Greytak
    2001, color, 90 mins.
    Purchase: $310| Classroom Rental: $125


    This feature-length, cross-cultural documentary, filmed on four continents, explores the lives of people who are living with physical disability, revealing their aspirations and realities. In Russia, director Sharon Greytak, who directs from a motorized wheelchair, interviews a man and woman with cerebral palsy, who struggle for independence and opportunity in a country where even access to wheelchairs is rare. In Hong Kong, a woman who had a stroke gains great insights into the world of disabilities within a society that fosters kinetic lives, as well as alternative healing possibilities. In Brazil, a man and woman speak candidly about the subtle ways in which their disability intertwines with economic conditions, religious notions, and social expectations. An Italian artist with a rare blood disorder contrasts his life and community before being afflicted with his crippling disease with the disturbing isolation he now feels. Finally, a post-polio American woman, who battled severe social and family prejudice when she entered an interracial marriage and bore healthy children, discusses the complex web of societal assumptions about disability as it relates to marriage, childbearing, partnering responsibilities, and job status. Through her insightful and sensitive interviews and an evocative visual style, Greytak weaves a story of resilience, vulnerability and the everyday struggle to carve out a sense of purpose and worth.

    Subjects & Collections



    Festivals & Awards

    CINE Golden Eagle Award
    Achievement Award, Superfest International Media Festival on Disabilities


    Reviews

    "engrossing and provocative?E beautifully shot and composed film."
    The Los Angeles Times

    "excellent...One of the most stimulating, illuminating films about disadvantaged people, who's in one of Greytak's many thoughtful statements—might not have lived to adulthood 100 years ago?Eome of the stories are heartbreaking, and others are profoundly uplifting."
    The Hollywood Reporter

    "fascinating."
    Variety