THE BALLAD OF BERING STRAIT

THE BALLAD OF BERING STRAIT

    Price: $310.00

    Code: 1961
    Format: DVD

    Directed by Nina Gilden Seavey
    2003, color, 98 minutes
    Purchase: $310 Classroom Rental: $125


    This cinéma-vérité documentary, shot in high definition video, follows seven Russian teenagers who came to America to become country music stars. In July 1999, the band, Bering Strait, began recording their first album in Nashville, and over the next two-and-a-half years Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Nina Gilden Seavey chronicled the band's response to the twists and turns of the recording industry, their rehearsals for a tour, their debut concert at the Grand Ole Opry, tense discussions about the course of their career with their managers, and their adaptation to life in America. The filmmakers also traveled with the band members to their homes in Obninsk, Russia, and to their music conservatories in Moscow, documenting how these two girls and five boys became so adept at playing American country music. The video culminates with the band's rousing concert performance on stage at Wolf Trap National Park, signaling the success of their amazing cultural fusion/coming of age journey in America.

    Subjects & Collections



    Festivals & Awards

    Nomintated for a News and Doc Emmy Award for Best Director
    Notable Video for Adults, American Library Association


    Reviews

    “Filmmaker Nina Gilden Seavey relates their trials and tribulations with sensitivity, honesty, and humor...The personalities of the band members shine through, and viewers will be intrigued throughout. Highlighting the difficult road to achieving a dream and the problems encountered by immigrants arriving in America, this film is well suited to public library and middle and high school library collections.” - School Library Journal

    "An appealing documentary." - The Washington Post

    "...[the documentary] lovingly chronicles the band's rocky road from classical musical conservatory in Russia to the country big time." - The New York Times