SUN, MOON, STARS: INDONESIA TRILOGY

SUN, MOON, STARS: INDONESIA TRILOGY

    Price: $795.00

    Code: 2414
    Format: DVD

    Directed by Leonard Retel Helmrich
    Purchase of Complete Set: $795
    Please inquire about classroom rental

    A landmark documentary trilogy, Sun, Moon, Stars: The Indonesia Trilogy captures the tumultuous changes taking place in Indonesia by following three generations of a single Jakarta family for over a decade. Directed by acclaimed filmmaker Leonard Retel Helmrich it offers an unparalleled portrait of a vibrant nation that is the world's fourth most populous country and home to the largest Muslim community.

    The films that comprise this trilogy are:

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    In this final film of the trilogy, Helmrich confronts the most important issues facing the country's fast-changing society: corruption, conflict between religions, gambling addiction, the generation gap, and the widening disparity between rich and poor.

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    The end of the Suharto regime ushered in an era of rapid sociopolitical upheaval in Indonesia. In this second installment of the trilogy, Helmrich returns to the Sjamsuddin family to intimately capture the changes taking place in their country, including the troubling rise of Islamic fundamentalism.

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    Against a backdrop of social unrest that led to Suharto's ouster, The Eye of the Day begins filmmaker Leonard Retel Helmrich's award-winning trilogy by introducing us to an ordinary family living in the slums of Jakarta; a family Helmrich would return to and document for more than a decade.


    Subjects & Collections



    Reviews

    Highly Recommended. "A cinematographic journey capturing the struggles of everyday life in Indonesia as seen through the eyes of the Sjamsuddin family".
    - Educational Media Reviews Online


    Further Reading

    The New York Times on the Sun, Moon, Stars Trilogy - "A Master of Impossible Camera Angles"
    In Leonard Retel Helmrich’s Shape of the Moon (2004) a barefoot man crosses a railroad trestle a thousand feet above an Indonesian valley, stepping briskly along a beam barely wider than his feet. We see him from behind. We see him from above. Most alarming, we see him from the side, by means of a camera that seems mounted in midair. It’s breathtaking, what the subject is doing. But a man with a camera is doing it too. Read More >>>